Thursday, May 21, 2009

Can You Really Train A Cat? Is It Worth The Trouble?


Cats are notoriously independent and have a mind of their own. Can you really teach a cat new tricks? Cat owners often think that their cat is just too moody to listen. Some owners feel their cats are un-trainable simply because they are arrogant. The fact is many times pets don’t obey because they don’t understand what you want from them. So, if you have tried to train your cat, you may not be doing it right.

Training your cat takes time and patience. It takes more of that then it does with a dog. A sure fire way to get results is to use positive reinforcement. Whatever you do, don’t scold your cat because she is likely to just misbehave when you aren’t looking. Instead, praise good behavior.Any cat can learn. It is wise to first start when the pet is young, about eight to ten weeks old. But, the pet will do well at any age.

How do you get started? The first thing to start with is training your cat to come when called. Hold your cat’s favorite treat and call his name. You’ll want to make sure he’s in a good mood. You’ll also want to make sure there isn’t a lot of noise either. Distractions will slow down the cat or confuse him. Decide on one command and use it solely. The command should be short and easy to say. For example, come kitty works well or here kitty will work too.

Now, get down on her level by sitting or kneeling on the floor. Give the command. Make sure your voice is exciting and happy. When the cat comes to you, reward him with the treat. Also, insure that you praise the cat as well. Then, move away and do the same thing again. The goal is to use the same tone of voice and the same command. Work on it for no more than ten minutes. If the cat is bored or frustrated, stop for the time. Try to do this two or three times a day for about a week.

Once he gets this command, you can move on to others.Some things that your cat needs to learn for his own well being are necessary to teach any and all cats. For example, he needs to learn to tolerate a harness and a leash in case you need to travel with him. Also, the cat should learn to use a crate.

Using a Leash and Harness: To do this, you’ll want to start by putting the harness on him. Do not restrain him once it is in place. Praise him for it. Give him a treat for behaving so well. Once he is used to wearing it, attach the leash to it and let him lead you throughout the area. Coax him into following you with treats and praise. Some cats will learn to heel on the leash. But, most will not. All should learn to not panic or to struggle, though when wearing a leash.

The Crate: When it comes to the crate, it can be done a little simpler. Cats like warm dark places so put a comfortable blanket and maybe even a favorite toy of the cat's inside the crate. Give him praise when you place him in it. Then, leave him there for a few minutes. Let him out within three to five minutes. Don’t praise him when he’s coming out of the crate because you do not want him to think this is the good thing. Make sure to reward him, though whenever he goes in. Leave the cat in the crate a little longer each time. Eventually your cat will be trained well enough to keep him in there. I hope these simple tips will show you how useful it can be to give your cat a little discipline.

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

We plan to post articles that are informative and helpful to other cat lovers. Having been "owned" by cats for years, we know they can be demanding, but also be very entertaining and fun.

Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com>

Saturday, May 16, 2009

Creative Cat Toys You Can Find Around Your Home


We all know that buying toys from your local pet shop can be expensive and after you bring it home, your cat may either turn up its nose at your offering or will tear the toy to pieces in a couple of hours. Why not save your money and entertain your cat with some of these suggestions of toys that can be made out of things you can find around your own home?

One of the things found around the home is string and I guarantee all cats love string. As it wiggles along the ground, moving fast and slow, it triggers your cat’s hunting mechanism and makes a great plaything. A great idea is to tie a long piece of string to a stick so you can drag it along the ground and tease your pet while sitting comfortable in a chair.

Other than the sound of pet food, nothing perks my cat's ears up like the sound of paper being rolled into a ball or even an open paper bag. A ball of paper about the size of a ping-pong ball is ideal for your cat to chase around the house. An open empty grocery bag on its side it something my cat loves. As he looks into the bag, I gently scratch on back of the bag and he will pounce. They will absolute love it. A similar thing to use for ball cat toys are rolled up small balls of foil.

Rope is another product from arount the home and is the most versatile product you can use to make different cat toys and activities. It’s great to wrap around a post to make your very own cat scratch post and can be pinned to pieces of board to make scratch boards that can be mounted on a wall inside or out.

There are many benefits to these activities. It helps to eliminate your cat's boredom, it gives your cat exercise, it gets you up off the couch, it helps you bond with your pet, and it provides amusement for you to name a few. And it also saves you money and gets your creative juices flowing. You may be able to create other cat toys with a little imagination.

These are just some of the things you can find inside your home to entertain your pet, without having to spend a lot of money in pet shops on toys and pet accessories.

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

We plan to post articles that are informative and helpful to other cat lovers. Having been "owned" by cats for years, we know they can be demanding, but also be very entertaining and fun.
Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

Sunday, January 4, 2009

Reasons Why Your Cat Won't Eat


If your cat won’t eat, keep in mind that stress can be a large cause of a cat’s loss of appetite. Just as stress in humans can lead to loss of appetite, the same can happen in cats. Felines can be very sensitive animals and your cat may be under more stress than you are aware of. Your cat can become stressed for a wide variety of reasons, most usually reasons involving some sort of change.

For instance, if you should move, it's possible that the stress of the move might have thrown the cat off of its food. A sudden change in food will sometimes cause your cat to lose its appetite. Stress may also be caused by conflict with another cat especially when a new cat is introduced into your home. Cats are very territorial creatures, and if your cat spends some time outdoors, territorial disputes may occur. Territorial disputes can also occur for indoor cats. You need to remove the problem, if not health related, in order to get the cat to eat.

Pets with poor appetite may also be sick, and if you wait until the appetite is completely gone it may be too late for recovery. This is particularly true for cats. Veterinarians worry about a cat not eating for a long period of time, and that this could result in liver failure.
Another situation you may need to be aware of is that when a cat is overweight and is on diet food, the overweight cat that stops eating is very prone to developing something called hepatic lipidosis (fatty liver).

If the cat won’t eat, talk to him and let him come to you for attention. If the problem is stress related, this one-on-one with him may help. If he still won't eat after a couple of days, talk with your vet and ask what options there are. If a visit to the veterinarian is advised and your cat cannot leave the house because he is stressed out by that, find a vet who will make house calls. Many do and even your regular vet may come to your house.

Veterinary care and advice costs money, occasionally a lot of money, but this should not prevent you from using a vet's services when you have to. At some point your cat will need the attention of a veterinarian; it's a fact of life, even if it is just for shots or for neutering.

Remember that veterinarians often disagree about the best treatments for pets. There are often several perfectly acceptable ways to treat the same condition.

When your cat won’t eat, it may be something as simple as the fact that he preferred what you gave him for dinner last night over what you gave him for dinner tonight. Or he could be stressed because there is a new cat in the house or some other change he really doesn’t like. Or he really could be truly ill. Sometimes you can figure out what the problem is simply by being observant and other times you will need a veterinarian to help.

Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

Saturday, January 3, 2009

Origin and History of the House Cat


Formerly it was generally thought that our house cats were simply the progeny of tamed pairs of the European wildcat; but anatomy denied the probability of this, and historical investigation showed that they came from another source. Historical evidence, including innumerable mummies, shows that the cat was domesticated by the Egyptians and North-Africans before the time of the oldest monuments of their civilization.

Moreover, the characteristic specific markings of the caffrc cat (still wild as well as tame in the Nile Valley) reappear unmistakably in our common house cats. This has happened in spite of the fact that interbreeding with other species and various local races has intervened over time. The Mediterranean cat is a well-marked variety of this cat that was found anciently and even now in Syria and eastward. It has been established that many centuries before the Christian era the Egyptians, Cretans, Phoenicians and other men of the Levant were constantly voyaging all over the Mediterranean Sea and founding trading-posts on both its shores. There finally arose and spread the extensive civilizations of Greece and of Rome on the north and of Carthage on the south.

When these explorers were spreading their colonies over vast areas, undoubtedly with them went their friendly and useful mousers. That they then were crossed somewhat with the native wildcat seems to be shown by the appearance of the peculiar form we call "tabby" cats. Briefly, this is the history of the common European house cat, whence have come, by emigration, those of America and most of the civilized world.

However, in the remote and isolated East, there exist many races of domesticated cats of more local origin. The late Professor G. Martorelli, of Milan, Italy, had made a special study of this whole subject and he had concluded that the ordinary domestic cat of India has descended from the Indian desert cat (Felis ornata). From it, he said, are derived their common spotted breed, while the fulvous breed seen in India has been produced by a cross with the native jungle cat (Felis chaus). Both these have interbred with the imported western cats in recent years.

The Persian or ''Angora" long-haired breeds may probably have come from Pallas' cat of central Asia; and the curious Siamese cat is regarded as derived from the golden cat. The intermingling accidentally, or by the design of breeders, of these various species and races has produced the bewildering variety of forms now seen.

There are so many varieties of cats that they must have originated from many different races and situations. Even today, professional breeders are developing new breeds of cats.

Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

Saturday, November 22, 2008

Thanksgiving and Your Cat

Here we are about to enter into the holiday season and with it being a holiday time, we want to include our pets in our holiday celebrations. After all, they are one of the family aren't they?. But we also want to keep our cats safe from all the potentially toxic (for them) foods and candy that come into our home during the holiday season. There are a few things that need to be said about "I wonder if the cat can eat that?" There are somethings that can be dangerous for your cat that you may not be aware of.

After having a large Thanksgiving dinner, offering a small piece of boneless, thoroughly cooked turkey, plain mashed potatoes and a smidge of pumpkin pie is not likely to be a harmful treat for your cat. Just be sure to avoid giving foods with large amounts of onion or garlic or any treats sweetened with artifical sweeteners. Because this can lower the blood sugar of both your dogs or your cats, this could lead to life threatening things such as seizures and liver failure.

Sage is considered to be edible and should be safe if given in small amounts. However, sage, as well as many other herbs, contain essential resins and oils that can cause gastrointestinal upset. In some cases it can cause nervous system depression if the cat gets too much of it. Cats are sensitive to the effects of essential oils, so for safety’s sake, I suggest you break the bad news to kitty and keep him away from the sage you are cooking with this Thanksgiving. Because cats can be very sensitive to the effects of essential oils, it is a good idea to discourage your cat from chewing on the needles of your beautiful Christmas tree as well.

Another thing that humans love, but pets should not be given, is chocolate which can be a problem for cats just as it for dogs. Since cats tend to be smaller than most dogs, it doesn't take as much chocolate to be a problem. Also, the type of chocolate your pet eats can makes a difference. The darker the chocolate the more dangerous, so bittersweet or dark chocolate will be alot worse than milk chocolate. Even though milk chocolate is not as bad as the dark chocolate, there is still another possible problem with it and that is the toxins that are in milk chocolate are excreted through the kidneys. It is not recommended that you let your cat have chocolate of any kind If it has kidney issues. With these problems, they would not be able to eliminate the toxins very well. But it is safer to eliminate any possible problems and just don't give them chocolate.

We hope this information has been helpful to you and will help keep you from "killing with kindness". We hope that both you, your family and your pets have a safe holiday.

Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

Sunday, November 16, 2008

City Cat vs. City Dog


Origin and History of the House Cat
Formerly, it was carelessly thought that our house cats were simply the progeny of tamed pairs of the European wildcats; but anatomy has denied the probability of this and historical investigation shows that they came from another source. Historical evidence, which includes innumerable mummies, shows that the cat was domesticated by the Egyptians before the time of the oldest monuments of their civilization.

Moreover, the characteristic specific markings of the caffrc cat (still wild as well as tame in the Nile Valley) reappear unmistakably in our common house cats in spite of the fact that interbreeding with other species has intervened. A well-marked variety of this cat, known as the Mediterranean cat, was and is found in ancient times as well as now in Syria and eastward. It is established that many centuries before the Christian era the Egyptians, Cretans, Phoenicians and other men of the Levant were constantly voyaging all over the Mediterranean Sea. They were busy founding trading-posts on both its shores, where finally arose and spread the extensive civilizations of Greece and Rome on the north, and of Carthage on the south.

With these colonists undoubtedly went their friendly and useful mousers. That they then were crossed somewhat with the native wildcat seems to be shown by the appearance of the peculiar form we call "tabby" cats. In brief, this is the history of the common European house cat and also those of America and most of the civilized world because of immigration. However, in the remote and isolated East exists races of domesticated cats of more local origin. Prof. G. Martorelli, of Milan, Italy, made a special study of this whole subject and he has concluded that the ordinary domestic cat of India has descended from the Indian desert cat. From it, he says, are derived their common spotted breed, while the fulvous breed seen in India has been produced by a cross with the native jungle cat. Both these have interbred with the imported western cats in recent years. The Persian or ''Angora" long-haired breeds may probably have come from the Pallas' cat of central Asia; and the curious Siamese cat is regarded as derived from the golden cat. Whether accidentally or by the design of breeders, intermingling of these various species and races has produced the bewildering variety of forms now seen.

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.

Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

Monday, November 10, 2008

When a Purr Becomes a Bite


It’s all quiet and you are just sitting there and your cat is lying in your lap, purring contentedly as you pet him. You both are just minding your own business and then all of a sudden, without any warning, he suddenly bites your hand and very quickly wants to jumps down and get away from you. I know that we have all had that happen at one time or another.
There are a few different reasons that are agreed upon by cat behaviorists as to what would make your cat become very upset with you that fast when they were just purring and dozing in your lap a moment ago. What are some of the things that may cause this to happen?
The cat in your lap has begun to doze, when suddenly he wakes up and just for that moment he becomes much disoriented. He is not sure where he is at that moment and by having your hands on him, he thinks you are holding him down and he fights to clear himself from the situation. Most of the time when he jumps down, he will look confused and then begin to groom him. This will help to calm himself down.
Nervous or sensitive cats tend to become somewhat jumpy and can be over-stimulated by petting for a long period of time. There are usually tell-tale warning signs that something is about to happen and the cat may attack. Look for restlessness, excessive tail movement, flattened ears, and the cat’s head turning toward your hand. It is important for us, as cat owners, to be alert to these signs and actions and be ready to stop petting the cat before this point is reached. At this time you may want to try a small treat to let the cat know that all is well and also a give a few more strokes to gradually increase his tolerance toward this situation. Never punish the cat because he has bitten you because this may cause him to become defensive and the cat may really strike back when provoked in this manner.
There are areas that a cat doesn’t like you petting, and one of these areas is the stomach region. When we do this, most of the time it puts the cat on their back and in a very vulnerable position. They do not like that at all. A cat in this position will almost always have a natural defensive reaction which includes striking back by wrapping his paws around the person's wrist, holding on, and biting.
Cats will vary in how much they like being restrained or held by their owners or by other people. Cats that don’t like being petted or held for a long period of time may still want to play with their owners. You may want to try and fellow them around the house, carefully lay on the bed with them, and even sit close to them. When we do these things these behaviors show the cat that we have an attachment toward them. There are some cats that are huggable and there are still others are not, but both types of cats can be very attached to their owners.


Visit our website for products your cat may enjoy www.besthousecatcare.com

NOTE: This article is for information only. See your veterinarian for medical advice.